Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Napoleonic Wargame Rules

I have decided to organise my classic Napoleonic collection on the same lines as other Hinton Hunt collectors. This means infantry units of 24 figures and cavalry with 12.

What I have yet to decide is the rules I am going to use. I have a number of choices and thought I would share these. 

Firstly there is the timeless classic Charge by Lawford and Young.


These rules, although identified with Imaginations and the seven years war are really more Napoleonic than is at first apparent with the use of skirmishers and rules for squares. As the cover jacket states these rules are for 1756 to 1815 confirms this.


 These were the first rules I used as a youngster and I have a particular fondness for them.


I also have Charles Grant Napoleonic rules and again these are aimed at the big battalion. 



Another set of rules I have are those published by Bayonet publications.


These rules seemed to be based on Donald Featherstone classic Horse and Musket rules from War Games.  I rather like these rules. Here are a few example pages of the rules.





Another set, Musket and Marshals,  are those available from the Hinton Vintage Figures blog

http://hintonhunt.blogspot.co.uk/p/muskets-marshals.html?m=0

I also have my an old copy of the Napoleonic Rules by T J Halsall.

The final choice is to write my own using bits and pieces from all the above plus a few of my owm thrown in.








12 comments:

tradgardmastare said...

Go Charge,you can't go wrong there...

Purp S said...

What about... https://wargamingmiscellanybackup.wordpress.com/category/edward-woodward/

johnpreece said...

I would always go with Charge! I have never had a bad game with them.

You are right in the Intro to C Grants The Wargame the Brigadier specifically states that Grants rules are SYW and Charge! are Napoleonic.

If you do decide on Charles Grant's rules I would get C S Grant's updated version which iron out the wrinkles.

I use 36 man Battalions and 12 man cavalry squadrons. But I use two or three together as a unit under the rules and for morale purposes. Works fine in practice.

I also substitute 5 sided dice for firing infantry and only allow one shot per two light infantry figures. But if you like a bloody game stick to the rules as written.

I look forward to reading more.

EB said...

A difficult decision.....or you could use all of the rules, including your own. My club was all over the place with its rules in the 70s but our favourites were the original WRG 'Flinch Point' rules. Part figure casualties, tables and all sorts - very modern then, old school now I suppose.
I found a copy of the Napoleonic Bayonet Publications rules only the other day, together with their WWII rules. I was well chuffed.

Charles Turnitsa said...

Fantastic article, and I envy you your decision. Luckily, your organization should let you try a number of different rule sets with the same organization. All the rules you mention are proper toy soldier rules, but the Bayonet set might be great fun, and a fast game.

Mark Dudley said...

Charge we the first proper rules I played. Still play well and you cannot beat the figure vs figure opposed die roll melees

Mark Dudley said...

I remember Callan and indeed still have a cooy of both the shire publications and the Miniature Warfare magazine mentioned.

Mark Dudley said...

I also have the bayonet WW2 and ECW rules. I always want to find a copy of the WW1 rules. I keep searching.

Mark Dudley said...

I agree Charge is a good choice.

Mark Dudley said...

I will certainly be giving the Bayonet rules a go.

Anonymous said...

I'm looking to use suggested amendments (for half-sized units) in the most recent edition of CS Grant's "The War Game". Rules for use of light infantry seem a better fit to the late C18th and Napoleonic periods than WAS/SYW to me anyway. Just a few amendments for things like forming square and I'm confident they'll work well. And I'll get to use a canister cone too of course!

Tony S

Mark Dudley said...

Hi Tony

I use the War Game for my 18th gaming and these could certainly be used for the Napoleonic period with a few extra rules as you mentioned.

Cannister sticks,roundshot and shells devices are essential paraphernalia for the War Game.

Mark